In Search of Heavenly Joys

Something I read today disarmed me with its sweetness. “When Cuthbert* was made prior at Melrose he did not restrict his teaching and influence to the monastery, but worked to rouse the ordinary folk far and near to exchange their foolish customs for a love of heavenly joys.”

The phrase that caught me was “exchange their foolish customs for a love of heavenly joys.” It seems to me that contemporary culture knows everything about foolish customs and nothing about heavenly joys.” What are our foolish customs? What are our heavenly joys?

I love that Cuthbert left the monastery to reach out to ordinary folk, on horseback or more often on foot, to visit neighboring towns, where he “preached the way of truth to those who had gone astray.”

The simplest way to contrast foolish customs for heavenly joys might be to look at the contrast between the fruit of the spirit and the fruit of the flesh.

Galatians 5: 19 The acts of the sinful nature are obvious: sexual immorality, impurity and debauchery; 20 idolatry and witchcraft; hatred, discord, jealousy, fits of rage, selfish ambition, dissensions, factions 21 and envy; drunkenness, orgies, and the like.

Galatians 5: 22 But the fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, 23 gentleness and self-control.

You know you’ve gone astray when your life consists the former, you know you are on the right path when the spirit is producing the latter in your life.

* Saint Cuthbert lived from 634 – 20 March 687 and was an Anglo-Saxon monk, bishop and hermit who eventually became one of the most important medieval saints of England with activities centered at Durham Cathedral. Cuthbert is regarded as the patron saint of northern England.

 

Posted in Staublog in March 24, 2011 by | 1 Comment »

One Response to In Search of Heavenly Joys

  1. Dick Staub on March 24, 2011 at 7:37 am

    […] Cuthbert worked to rouse the ordinary folk far and near “to exchange their foolish customs for a love of heavenly joys.” It seems to me that contemporary culture knows everything about foolish customs and nothing about heavenly joys.” What are our foolish customs? What are our heavenly joys? Read More. […]

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