Finding Your Passion.

I often find myself believing in people more than they believe in themselves, especially when they have not discovered and found outlets for their personal passions and talents.

This is what is on my mind in Miami Wednesday evening, when we experienced a once-in-a-lifetime meal. But what was most obvious was the passion of chef Shin’ichi Ogino. I swear we were in a Japanese version of Babette’s feast, a master chef working magic on the palettes of appreciative mere mortals.

Five of us (Me, Kathy, daughter Jess, Kathy’s brother Chuck and his wife Ileene) ate eleven savory courses in the home of Japanese chef Shin’ichi Ogino and his wife Rieko. He cooked, she served, both of them entertainingly narrated, and we ate.

The menu is written in Japanese and awaits translation, but the eleven courses included over 100 delicacies prepared over the period of five days. The stone crab was fresh off the boat that day, the “fatty tuna” flown in from Japan fresh as was the strawberry snapper. The ginger was grown in his garden, the soy sauce homemade.

The food was extraordinary, melt-in-your mouth with subtle tastes and textures artistically arranged and presented, but even more memorable was chef Ogino whose passion for fresh ingredients and the ancient Japanese tradition of Sho-ojin Ryoori were behind each hand crafted dish.

He is an artist working with food like Makoto Fujimura is a Nihunga artist working with the finest precious metals ground into paint. Attention to the tiniest detail matters.

Shin’ichi Ogino is an effusive, energetic, jolly evangelist for healthy eating ~ fresh, no sugar or MSG or over-salted soy. Shin’ichin loves what he is doing and explained each course joyfully and enthusiastically.

This is at the heart of the vision I articulated in my most recent book, About You. That each of us would possess this passion for life and express our uniqueness in work, with or without pay in ways that benefit the world around us. This is my vision and that of the creator.

What do you do well and enjoy doing? How can you hone your craft? What outlets will allow you to share who you are, through what you do; joyfully, eagerly, enthusiastically and passionately?

Our God-given, unique aptitudes and talents, fully developed and regularly expressed is the pathway to our personal joy but even more, it is the path for the well being of the people around us, who wait for us to bring our loaves and fishes to share with them as we await theirs.

The glory of God is a human fully alive, and Shinichi & Reiko Ogino seem fully alive.

Posted in Staublog in February 24, 2011 by | 1 Comment »

One Response to Finding Your Passion.

  1. 022411 | Dick Staub on February 24, 2011 at 8:05 am

    […] I often find myself believing in people more than they believe in themselves, especially when they have not discovered and found outlets for their personal passions and talents. Read More. […]

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